“. . . know This isn’t a place to call home. . .” (Fady Joudah)

(A blog linking to information about PALESTINE not available in mainstream media.
“Online Resources” above lists helpful sites. Works by Palestinian poets close all posts.)

“EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR. . ."
“EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR. . .”

$1000 SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Interfaith Peace-Builders is offering two $1,000 Scholarships for students and young adults who travel on Interfaith Peace-Builders’ July/August 2015 Delegation. In addition to the two $1000 scholarships, anyone who applies will also be considered for smaller financial aid packages from IFPB, ranging from $250 – $500. Our delegations are the core of Interfaith Peace-Builders’ work. . . IFPB delegations expose participants to perspectives that are not readily available in North America. Meetings with diverse representatives of Palestinian and Israeli society focus particularly on those working nonviolently for a resolution to the conflict and an end to the occupation.

IFPB Delegation, August, 2013
IFPB Delegation, August, 2013

Delegates see the Wall, checkpoints, and demolished homes and learn how these and much more affect Palestinians.

Likewise, delegates hear from Israelis about the effects of the conflict on Israeli society. The experiential learning that the delegation fosters is intended to motivate action for change when delegates return.

haaretz

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ABUSING THE PALESTINIAN CORPSE
Controlling the water, electricity and taxes, Israel’s mob – IEC, Customs and the infrastructure ministry – shows the Palestinian Authority who’s the boss.
By Zvi Bar’el | Feb. 25, 2015
There is no closure on the West Bank: Citizens can go out in the streets, travel, spend time in Ramallah’s discotheques and renovate their homes. Paradise.

But just so they won’t forget where they came from, and where they’re going, Israel reminds them that their ship of fools is no more than a corpse tossed to the side of the road, with every passerby permitted to kick it or spit on it. (Full story)

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fmepWASHINGTON POST GIVES HUCKABEE A PLATFORM ON ISRAEL
Mitchell Plitnick
February 25, 2015
As a Jew, I would be absolutely appalled to read these sentences: “The Huckabeeans also heard from Muhammed Tamimi, national president of the Arab Organization of America, who explained to the group, according to

Huckabee, that there’s really no such thing as the ‘Jewish People.’ ‘The idea that they have a long history here, dating back hundreds or thousands of years, is not true,’ Huckabee said.”

In fact, what appeared in the front-page article of today’s Washington Post read, “The Huckabeeans also heard from Morton Klein, national president of the Zionist Organization of America, who explained to the group, according to Huckabee, that there’s really no such thing as the ‘Palestinians.’ ‘The idea that they have a long history, dating back hundreds or thousands of years, is not true,’ Huckabee said.”

Aside from mentioning that prospective GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee and his group would not be visiting Ramallah or meeting with any Palestinians, there was no mention of the Palestinians in this piece at all. (Full Story)

THREE ACADEMIC JOURNAL ARTICLES ON CHILDREN IN PALESTINE

Giacaman, Rita, et al. “MENTAL HEALTH, SOCIAL DISTRESS AND POLITICAL OPPRESSION: THE CASE OF THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY.” Global Public Health 6.5 (2011): 547-559.
Rita Giacaman, Yoke Rabaia, Viet Nguyen-Gillham, Rajaie Batniji, Raija-Leena Punamaki, and Derek Summerfield

This paper presents a brief history of Palestinian mental health care, a discussion of the current status of mental health and

health services in the occupied Palestinian territory, and a critique of the biomedical Western-led discourse as it relates to the mental health needs of Palestinians. Medicalising distress and providing psychological therapies for Palestinians offer little in the way of alleviating the underlying causes of ongoing collective trauma. This paper emphasises the importance of separating clinical responses to mental illness from the public health response to mass political violation and distress. . . Recognising social suffering as a public mental health issue requires a shift in the emphasis from narrow medical indicators, injury and illness to the lack of human security and human rights violations experienced by ordinary Palestinians. . . [and requires] development of a sustainable system of public mental health services, in combination with advocacy for human rights and the restoration of political, historical and moral justice. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (Full Article)

Abdelziz Thabet, “EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR ON DISSOCIATIVE SYMPTOMS AND RESILIENCE AMONG PALESTINIAN ADOLESCENTS IN THE GAZA STRIP.” The Arab Journal of Psychiatry (2014) Vol. 25 No. 2

As well as the obvious physical damage, Israel’s attacks will leave a severe psychological mark on Gaza’s

EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR
EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR

surviving children. Three months after the last period of bombing ended, in January 2009, Abdelziz Thabet, a child psychiatrist at Al-Quds University in the Gaza Strip, studied the effects of the bombing on Palestinian children.

The (2008) Gaza war lasted three weeks and saw 1100 Palestinians and 13 Israelis . Of the 358 teenagers Thabet studied, 30 per cent were left with full-blown post-traumatic stress disorder. Most other teenagers presented some PTSD symptoms, and only 12 per cent had no symptoms. The study was published in the May issue of the Arab Journal of Psychiatry, just a month before the 2014 campaign began. (Full article)

Al-Krenawi, Alean, and John R. Graham. “THE IMPACT OF POLITICAL VIOLENCE ON PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES: THE CASE OF PALESTINIAN ADOLESCENTS.”Child & Adolescent Mental Health 17.1 (2012): 14-22.

The impact of political violence on the psychosocial functioning of adolescents and their families was compared for surveyed populations from two regions of Palestine. Method: A randomly-selected sample of 971 adolescents (521 from the West Bank and 450 from the Gaza Strip regions, 42% male/57% female) completed scales measuring traumatic event, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), peer relations, mental health, aggression, and family functioning. Results: (1) West Bank participants reported a significantly higher level of exposure to political violence and significantly more aggression, mental health symptoms, problems in family and social functioning; (2) Participants exposed to greater political violence reported higher levels of depression, hostility, paranoid ideation, and PTSD; (3) Economic status and level of parental education were related to reduced levels of mental health symptoms and greater family functioning; (4) There were gendered differences. Conclusions: The study provides a starting point to begin to compare the experiences and outcomes between Palestinian adolescents in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and a basis for considering implications for service delivery and policy makers concerned with the wellbeing of Palestinian communities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]  (Full article)

MIMESI, by Fady Joudah

My daughter
wouldn’t hurt a spider
That had nested
Between her bicycle handles
For two weeks
She waited
Until it left of its own accord

If you tear down the web I said
It will simply know
This isn’t a place to call home
And you’d get to go biking

She said that’s how others
Become refugees isn’t it?

From Alight. Copyright © 2013 by Fady Joudah
Fady Joudah is a Palestinian-American poet and physician. He is the 2007 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition for his collection of poems The Earth in the Attic. He was born January 1, 1971 (age 44), Austin, TX.

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