“. . . we will not remain silent towards the policies that target our people, wherever they may be . . .” (Committee for Arab Citizens of Israel)

oct-2000-protest3
Demonstrations by Palestinian citizens of Israel in early October 2000 which resulted in 13 civilian deaths. (Photo: Adalah, via +972 Blog)

❶ Palestinians commemorate killing of 13 protesters in Israel
❷ Israeli schemes attacking Haifa endowments
. . . ❷ ― (a) Palestinian Homes Abandoned in Nakba Attest To History of Haifa’s Wadi Salib Neighborhood

  • Background from Florida Journal Of International Law

. . . ❷ ― (b) In Israeli City of Haifa, a Liberal Arab Culture Blossoms
. . . ❷ ― (c) Awqaf (Endowment) of Haifa District During the British Mandate (1922-1948) A Documentary Study
❸ Palestinian Oral History as a Tool to Defend Against Displacement
` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` ` `
PALESTINIANS  COMMEMORATE  KILLING  OF  13  PROTESTERS  IN  ISRAEL
Ma’an News Agency
Oct. 1, 2016
Palestinians in Israel on Saturday commemorated the 16th anniversary of the killing of 13 civilians by Israeli forces in October 2000 during a series of Palestinian protests in northern Israel at the onset of the second Intifada.
___A statement released by the High Follow-Up Committee for Arab Citizens of Israel condemned Israel’s continued oppression and discrimination of Palestinian citizens of Israel.
[. . . .]   “Our message to the (Israeli government) as we mark this anniversary is that we will not remain silent towards the policies that target our people, wherever they may be. We will not remain silent towards the policy of racial discrimination that targets us, especially at this stage of escalating racial incitement against our people,” the committee’s statement concluded.      More . . .  
ISRAELI  SCHEMES  ATTACKING  HAIFA  ENDOWMENTS
Alray-Palestinian Media Agency
Sep. 29, 2016
The activist in ” We will protect Haifa endowments” Orwa Sittat warned of Israeli plans targeting Haifa endowments, stressing that the Haifa endowments are of the biggest endowments in seize in the historical Palestine.
___”The endowments issue represented the identity, land and right, and the ambition of the next generations in Haifa,” he said, pointing out that the Palestinian home is in front of a historical stage of defending the rights and properties.      More . . .
. . . ❷ ― (a) PALESTINIAN  HOMES  ABANDONED  IN  NAKBA  ATTEST  TO  HISTORY  OF  HAIFA’S  WADI  SALIB  NEIGHBORHOOD
Washington Report on Middle East Affairs
William Parry
January/February 2016
To anyone familiar with Israel’s policies and practices in occupied Palestine and Israel itself there is little that is striking about its ethnic cleansing of Palestine—apart from how oblivious most Israelis are to it. Despite its simmering, systematic banality and barbarity, most Israelis seem to possess an uncanny knack for denying their history and present alike and simply get on with life.
___ But in Wadi Salib, a formerly affluent Palestinian neighborhood of Haifa, the wrongs of Israel’s past remain so prominently displayed that it is particularly unsettling. More . . . 

  • Kagan, Michael. “Restitution As A Remedy For Refugee Property Claims In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.” Florida Journal Of International Law 19.2 (2007): 421-489.  Full Article.

[. . . .] . . . around 700,000 non-Jewish Palestinians were displaced, representing roughly three-quarters of the non-Jewish population of the country . . . These refugees left behind substantial immoveable property . . . .
[. . . .]   It is disputed how much refugee property is actually in use by Israelis today because Jewish Israeli life appears to still be concentrated in those regions that were Jewish-owned before 1948 . . .  around one in five Israeli citizens are Palestinian Arabs whose families either were not displaced in 1948 or were internally displaced within the borders of the future State of Israel . . . .  Confiscated urban property included residential property (homes and apartments), as well as more than 8000 businesses
[. . . .]  Property seizures closely followed refugee flights and expulsions through the course of the 1948 war . . . . Both the seizures and the transfers were legitimized, at least for Israeli domestic law, via legislation passed by the Knesset in 1950 . . . . Israeli authorities were often attempting to legitimize transactions after the fact. The legal regime they enacted enabled the State of Israel to transform previously Arab property into “Israel Lands” that were managed mainly for the benefit of Jews.
___ . . . even before the official founding of the State of Israel, decisions to seize refugee property were taken . . .  In March 1948 . . .  the Hagana created a Commission for Arab Property in Villages, and in April 1948 (following the conquest by Israeli forces of the northern cities of Haifa, Tiberias and Safad) established the Supervisor of Arab Property in the Northern District, as well as the Committee for Abandoned Arab Property.
[. . . .]  Refugee property is far more likely to have been left unused in the Israeli northern and southern peripheries (Galilee and Negev) than in the densely developed triangle between Tel Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem. However, in a few urban areas, Israelis are now living in former Arab homes . . .
[. . . .] These initial regulations authorized the seizure of any land that was “abandoned.” Abandoned areas were defined to include any area that “(1) had been conquered by or surrendered to Israeli armed forces; or (2) had been partially or completely deserted by its inhabitants”
[. . . .] Israeli policymakers found the Abandoned Areas Ordinance unsatisfactory because it did not legally permit the state to sell or transfer the seized property, and because some officials worried that it would be condemned internationally . . . . In December 1948, Israel shifted its definition of land subject to confiscation in order to appear more legally legitimate by mirroring World War Il-era British laws. The Minister of Finance issued the Emergency Regulations regarding Absentee Property, which established the basic definition of an absentee that is still in use today.

. . . ❷ ― (b)  IN  ISRAELI  CITY  OF  HAIFA,  A  LIBERAL  ARAB  CULTURE  BLOSSOMS
New York Times
Diaa Hadi
Jan. 3, 2016
At Elika, a bar in the Hadar neighborhood of this hilly port city, a 30-something psychodramatist rolled a cigarette and sipped coffee with her father, a well-known actor in Israel.     [. . . .] They were among the . . .  women and men who populate a slice of Haifa’s social scene that resembles that of the well-heeled hipsters of Tel Aviv. . .  and they have unfurled a self-consciously Arab milieu that is secular, feminist and gay-friendly.   ___“Haifa is a center for Arabs, like Tel Aviv is a center for Jews,” said Asil Abu Wardeh . . . “There is a cultural movement. There is a youth movement. There’s a kind of freedom here.”     More . . .   
. . . ❷ ― (c) AWQAF  (ENDOWMENT)  OF  HAIFA  DISTRICT  DURING  THE  BRITISH  MANDATE  (1922-1948):  A  DOCUMENTARY  STUDY
Radi Ahmed Theeb Fashafsheh
Doctoral Dissertation, An-Najah National University, Nablus (2013)

haifa-home
Abdul-Latif Kanafani house on Bourj Street in Haifa. (Photo: Al-Akhbar)
From   A  FINAL  VISIT:  THE  KANAFANI  HOME  IN  HAIFA
Al-Akhbar English
Mona al-Omari
Nov. 16, 2012

PALESTINIAN  ORAL  HISTORY  AS  A  TOOL  TO  DEFEND  AGAINST  DISPLACEMENT
Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network
Thayer Hastings
Sep. 15, 2016
Oral history has a long precedent in Arab and Palestinian culture that stems from a broader oral tradition. 1 In the years immediately following the Nakba of 1948 the Arab tradition of the hakawati (storyteller) was used, according to Nur Masalha, to shore up a defense against erasure of culture and memory among Palestinians. Since then, oral history has served as a prominent counter narrative in the context of active settler colonialism throughout Palestine and colonialism’s afterlives in the Arab world. It is a primary method through which Palestinians engage collective events of trauma or mobilization.    More . . .  

 

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