“. . . Jaffa, who broke the days on these sands, is motionless. . .” (Rashid Hussein)

The Bedouin village of Umm el-Hieran
The Bedouin village of Umm el-Hieran

From MONDOWEISS
ONE LAST APPEAL BEFORE A BEDOUIN VILLAGE IN THE NEGEV IS DEMOLISHED AND A JEWISH TOWN IS BUILT IN ITS PLACE
Allison Deger
June 1, 2015
The Bedouin village of Umm el-Hieran in Israel’s southern Negev desert is running out of time and appeals before it will be razed to the ground and an exclusively Jewish town will be built in its place. After a decade of legal battles—a matrix of court cases over lands, houses, and demolition orders—the Bedouins now have one final petition at their disposal, a re-trial. If they lose this hearing their township will be demolished and the saga will end with a modern Jewish bedroom community owned by a private Israeli developer that does not sell homes to Arabs. . .
____. . . In the lead up to the final ruling expected in the next few months the 25 Jewish-Israeli families who want to move into Umm el-Hieran are already living in mobile houses in a nearby nature reserve. They relocated there in 2009. Set behind a barbed-wire fence and a gate, they are ready to motor their caravans downhill to the Bedouin town as soon as the bulldozers remove the last shanty structure. Their hope is to construct 2,500 units serving more than 10,000 Israelis.
(More. . .)

From MA’AN NEWS AGENCY
GERMAN FOREIGN MINISTER CALLS FOR LIFTING OF GAZA BLOCKADE DURING VISIT
June 1, 2015
GAZA CITY (Ma’an)
The German foreign minister on Monday called on Israel to lift the blockade of Gaza in return for Palestinian security reassurances during a visit to the beleaguered coastal enclave.
____Frank-Walter Steinmeier, heading a delegation of 60 German officials, arrived in the region on Saturday to hold talks with top Palestinian and Israeli officials.
____During Monday’s visit to Gaza he said the enclave was a “powder keg” at risk of exploding, and called for efforts to quicken reconstruction.
____”I came out of all my discussions yesterday in Jerusalem and in Ramallah with the hope that all parties are mindful that here we are sitting on a powder keg here and that we must ensure that the fuse does not catch light,” Steinmeier said at a press conference in Gaza City’s fishing port. . .
(More. . .)

From MA’AN NEWS AGENCY
LAWYER: PALESTINIAN CHILDREN FACING TORTURE IN ISRAELI JAILS
May 31, 2015
Palestinian children are being beaten and tortured in a “heinous” way by Israeli soldiers during interrogation, a Palestinian Authority lawyer has said.
____Hiba Masalha, a lawyer for the PA committee of prisoners’ affairs, said in a statement on Sunday that teenage detainees are being “terrified, threatened and blackmailed” in contravention of international law and conventions advocating children’s rights.
____Masalha said that she had visited Section 3 of Megeddo prison, where 68 Palestinian teens are currently being held. Most of the detainees she met had been arrested from an orphanage in the northern West Bank city of Tulkarem. . .
(More. . .)

Dangerous children
Dangerous children

From THIS WEEK IN PALESTINE
Special report
ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE PALESTINE CAPITAL MARKET AUTHORITY
Abeer Odeh
June 2015
The Palestine Capital Market Authority (PCMA) is a quasi-governmental agency . . . established in 2004 as the regulator of the Palestinian non-banking financial sector. The PCMA is governed by a board of directors . . . and its mission is to regulate, supervise, and oversee the securities, insurance, financial leasing, and mortgage finance sectors in Palestine . . . the PCMA is responsible for developing and maintaining sound capital markets in Palestine. . . .
____During recent years, Palestine has successfully positioned itself as an emerging nation on the international stage by joining several international organizations where it can demonstrate its capabilities. After the state of Palestine was granted observer status by the United Nations General Assembly . . . February 2014, the PCMA was admitted as the 124th ordinary member of the International Organization of Securities (IOSCO). . . .
(More. . .)

From JONATHAN COOK: THE BLOG FROM NAZARETH
BEN GURION ’48 LETTER BARRED RETURN TO HAIFA
Jonathan Cook
May 27, 2015
Over many decades, Israel’s self-serving deceptions about the Nakba in 1948 have been exposed for the lies Palestinians already knew them to be.
____It was long accepted in the west that, as Israel claimed, Palestinians left their homes because they had been ordered to do so by neighbouring Arab leaders. . .
____. . . For decades Israel’s supporters have been arguing that Haifa, one of Palestine’s most important cities, was not ethnically cleansed of its population. The tens of thousands of Palestinians who fled under Israeli attack in April 1948 were later urged to return, according to Israel’s supporters, but they chose not to . . . But now a letter signed by David Ben Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister and the engineer of its ethnic cleansing policy in 1948, shows that, far from Haifa’s doors being thrown open, Ben Gurion ordered that the refugees be barred from returning. . .
(More. . .)

“Jaffa,” by Rashid Hussein
An opiate cloud hangs over Jaffa,
And the lean roads are pregnant with flies and boredom.
In the streets of heaven, the moon’s funeral.
Jaffa is then without a moon;
Jaffa is then blood on a stone.

Jaffa, who suckled me the milk of orange,
Thirsts! She, whose waves watered the rain.
Jaffa, who broke the days on these sands,
Is motionless, her back broken.
Jaffa, who once was a garden, its trees, men,
Is now an opium den dulling our senses.

I was in Jaffa, removing the rats from her forehead,
Raising the rubble, uncovering corpses without knees,
Burying the stars in the sands and fences.
I took the bullets from her bones and sipped anger.

And, when feeling tired, I got myself a dry bush,
Smoked it and rested.

From A Lover from Palestine and Other Poems: An Anthology of Palestinian Poetry. Ed. By Abdul Wahab Al-Messiri. Washington, D.C.: Free Palestine Press, 1970.

Rashid Hussein was born in Nazareth in the Galilee in 1936. After college he was a school teacher, but was dismissed for his political views. He edited Al-Fajr, an Arabic journal that was banned in 1962. He later wrote on Arab affairs for Uri Aveneri’s paper Ha-olam Hazeh.
____He published two volumes of poetry in 1957 and 1959. He was one of the organizers of Al-Ard, the revolutionary Palestinian movement whose goal was equality for all citizens of Israel that started in 1958 and was banned in 1964. He was imprisoned by Israel several times. He finally chose self-exile after the 1967 War. He emigrated to New York where he lived and wrote until his death in 1977.

One of the many homes of Palestinian families taken over by Jewish fighters in 1948 and still occupied by Israeli citizens, the Palestinian owners having no Right of Return.
One of the many homes of Palestinian families in Jaffa taken over by Jewish fighters in 1948 and still occupied by Israeli citizens, the Palestinian owners having no Right of Return. The same situation exists in Haifa.

“. . . know This isn’t a place to call home. . .” (Fady Joudah)

(A blog linking to information about PALESTINE not available in mainstream media.
“Online Resources” above lists helpful sites. Works by Palestinian poets close all posts.)

“EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR. . ."
“EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR. . .”

$1000 SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Interfaith Peace-Builders is offering two $1,000 Scholarships for students and young adults who travel on Interfaith Peace-Builders’ July/August 2015 Delegation. In addition to the two $1000 scholarships, anyone who applies will also be considered for smaller financial aid packages from IFPB, ranging from $250 – $500. Our delegations are the core of Interfaith Peace-Builders’ work. . . IFPB delegations expose participants to perspectives that are not readily available in North America. Meetings with diverse representatives of Palestinian and Israeli society focus particularly on those working nonviolently for a resolution to the conflict and an end to the occupation.

IFPB Delegation, August, 2013
IFPB Delegation, August, 2013

Delegates see the Wall, checkpoints, and demolished homes and learn how these and much more affect Palestinians.

Likewise, delegates hear from Israelis about the effects of the conflict on Israeli society. The experiential learning that the delegation fosters is intended to motivate action for change when delegates return.

haaretz

.

ABUSING THE PALESTINIAN CORPSE
Controlling the water, electricity and taxes, Israel’s mob – IEC, Customs and the infrastructure ministry – shows the Palestinian Authority who’s the boss.
By Zvi Bar’el | Feb. 25, 2015
There is no closure on the West Bank: Citizens can go out in the streets, travel, spend time in Ramallah’s discotheques and renovate their homes. Paradise.

But just so they won’t forget where they came from, and where they’re going, Israel reminds them that their ship of fools is no more than a corpse tossed to the side of the road, with every passerby permitted to kick it or spit on it. (Full story)

.
fmepWASHINGTON POST GIVES HUCKABEE A PLATFORM ON ISRAEL
Mitchell Plitnick
February 25, 2015
As a Jew, I would be absolutely appalled to read these sentences: “The Huckabeeans also heard from Muhammed Tamimi, national president of the Arab Organization of America, who explained to the group, according to

Huckabee, that there’s really no such thing as the ‘Jewish People.’ ‘The idea that they have a long history here, dating back hundreds or thousands of years, is not true,’ Huckabee said.”

In fact, what appeared in the front-page article of today’s Washington Post read, “The Huckabeeans also heard from Morton Klein, national president of the Zionist Organization of America, who explained to the group, according to Huckabee, that there’s really no such thing as the ‘Palestinians.’ ‘The idea that they have a long history, dating back hundreds or thousands of years, is not true,’ Huckabee said.”

Aside from mentioning that prospective GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee and his group would not be visiting Ramallah or meeting with any Palestinians, there was no mention of the Palestinians in this piece at all. (Full Story)

THREE ACADEMIC JOURNAL ARTICLES ON CHILDREN IN PALESTINE

Giacaman, Rita, et al. “MENTAL HEALTH, SOCIAL DISTRESS AND POLITICAL OPPRESSION: THE CASE OF THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY.” Global Public Health 6.5 (2011): 547-559.
Rita Giacaman, Yoke Rabaia, Viet Nguyen-Gillham, Rajaie Batniji, Raija-Leena Punamaki, and Derek Summerfield

This paper presents a brief history of Palestinian mental health care, a discussion of the current status of mental health and

health services in the occupied Palestinian territory, and a critique of the biomedical Western-led discourse as it relates to the mental health needs of Palestinians. Medicalising distress and providing psychological therapies for Palestinians offer little in the way of alleviating the underlying causes of ongoing collective trauma. This paper emphasises the importance of separating clinical responses to mental illness from the public health response to mass political violation and distress. . . Recognising social suffering as a public mental health issue requires a shift in the emphasis from narrow medical indicators, injury and illness to the lack of human security and human rights violations experienced by ordinary Palestinians. . . [and requires] development of a sustainable system of public mental health services, in combination with advocacy for human rights and the restoration of political, historical and moral justice. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (Full Article)

Abdelziz Thabet, “EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR ON DISSOCIATIVE SYMPTOMS AND RESILIENCE AMONG PALESTINIAN ADOLESCENTS IN THE GAZA STRIP.” The Arab Journal of Psychiatry (2014) Vol. 25 No. 2

As well as the obvious physical damage, Israel’s attacks will leave a severe psychological mark on Gaza’s

EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR
EFFECT OF TRAUMA DUE TO WAR

surviving children. Three months after the last period of bombing ended, in January 2009, Abdelziz Thabet, a child psychiatrist at Al-Quds University in the Gaza Strip, studied the effects of the bombing on Palestinian children.

The (2008) Gaza war lasted three weeks and saw 1100 Palestinians and 13 Israelis . Of the 358 teenagers Thabet studied, 30 per cent were left with full-blown post-traumatic stress disorder. Most other teenagers presented some PTSD symptoms, and only 12 per cent had no symptoms. The study was published in the May issue of the Arab Journal of Psychiatry, just a month before the 2014 campaign began. (Full article)

Al-Krenawi, Alean, and John R. Graham. “THE IMPACT OF POLITICAL VIOLENCE ON PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES: THE CASE OF PALESTINIAN ADOLESCENTS.”Child & Adolescent Mental Health 17.1 (2012): 14-22.

The impact of political violence on the psychosocial functioning of adolescents and their families was compared for surveyed populations from two regions of Palestine. Method: A randomly-selected sample of 971 adolescents (521 from the West Bank and 450 from the Gaza Strip regions, 42% male/57% female) completed scales measuring traumatic event, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), peer relations, mental health, aggression, and family functioning. Results: (1) West Bank participants reported a significantly higher level of exposure to political violence and significantly more aggression, mental health symptoms, problems in family and social functioning; (2) Participants exposed to greater political violence reported higher levels of depression, hostility, paranoid ideation, and PTSD; (3) Economic status and level of parental education were related to reduced levels of mental health symptoms and greater family functioning; (4) There were gendered differences. Conclusions: The study provides a starting point to begin to compare the experiences and outcomes between Palestinian adolescents in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and a basis for considering implications for service delivery and policy makers concerned with the wellbeing of Palestinian communities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]  (Full article)

MIMESI, by Fady Joudah

My daughter
wouldn’t hurt a spider
That had nested
Between her bicycle handles
For two weeks
She waited
Until it left of its own accord

If you tear down the web I said
It will simply know
This isn’t a place to call home
And you’d get to go biking

She said that’s how others
Become refugees isn’t it?

From Alight. Copyright © 2013 by Fady Joudah
Fady Joudah is a Palestinian-American poet and physician. He is the 2007 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition for his collection of poems The Earth in the Attic. He was born January 1, 1971 (age 44), Austin, TX.

“. . . they shout, but their clamour makes no sound . . .” (Mourid Barghouti)

regular for every postFrom:
ei
YOUNG DANCER JAILED BY ISRAEL FOR TAKING PART IN PROTEST

By Charlotte Kates. Beirut. 13 February 2015

Lina Khattab, 18, is in her first year of media studies at Birzeit University in the occupied West Bank. An accomplished dancer, she is a member of the renowned troupe El-Funoun.

She was arrested by the Israeli military on 13 December as she joined fellow university students in a march to Israel’s Ofer prison, which holds Palestinian political prisoners.

El-Funoun has produced a video of scenes from her arrest spliced with some of her performances with the troupe, which specializes in the traditional Palestinian dance dabke.

Khattab has now been imprisoned for nearly two months and brought before the military court at Ofer nine times. Her last hearing on 25 January was a closed session; no family or observers were allowed to enter the military court. (Full story.)

Follow-up story from
mondoweiss
.

ISRAEL SENTENCES PALESTINIAN TEEN LINA KHATTAB TO 6 MONTHS IN PRISON FOR PROTESTING
By Ben Norton, February 18, 2015

_________________________________________
From:
haaretz

AMERICAN JEWS, SPEAK OUT AGAINST NETANYAHU’S POLICIES
Benjy Cannon
Feb. 18, 2015
The Israeli prime minister and the majority of U.S. Jews fundamentally disagree on key issues. The time has come for American Jewish institutions to address this tension.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s planned speech before Congress – organized behind President Obama’s back – has uncharacteristically split the Jewish communal establishment. Yet the controversy over the speech exposes a tension that has been brewing below the surface for years. The fact is that when it comes to politics, values and the key issues that will decide Israel’s future, Netanyahu and the majority of American Jews fundamentally disagree. The time has come for American Jewish institutions to accept and address that important tension.

The speech, and Netanyahu’s intransigent refusal to back down from it, have created a firestorm of criticism, coming from such mainstream Jewish leaders as Abe Foxman of the Anti-Defamation League and Rabbi Rick Jacobs of the Union for Reform Judaism.  (Full story.)
________________________

From:
palestine

ISIS AND ISRAEL: ALLIES AGAINST A PALESTINIAN STATE
Sep 10 2014
By Jonathan Cook – Nazareth

An image speaks a thousand words – and that is presumably what Israel’s supporters hoped for with their latest ad in the New York Times.

Two photographs are presented side by side. One, titled ISIS, is the now-iconic image of a kneeling James Foley. . . awaiting his terrible fate. The other, titled Hamas, is a scene from Gaza, where a similarly masked killer stands over two victims. . .

A headline stating “This is the face of radical Islam” tries, like the images, to equate the two organizations. . . Netanyahu’s depiction of Hamas and ISIS, or Islamic State, as “branches of the same poisonous tree” is a travesty of the truth.

ISIS militants burning Palestinian flag.
ISIS militants burning Palestinian flag.

The two have entirely different – in fact, opposed – political projects. ISIS wants to return to a supposed era of pure Islamic rule, the caliphate, when all Muslims were subject to God’s laws . . . the implication is that ISIS ultimately seeks world domination.

Hamas’s goals are decidedly more modest. It was born and continues as a national liberation movement, seeking to create a Palestinian state. Its members may disagree on that state’s territorial limits but even the most ambitious expect no more than the historic borders of a Palestine that existed a few decades ago. (Full story.)

__________________________________________

“A NIGHT UNLIKE OTHERS,” by Mourid Barghouti
His finger almost touches the bell,
the door, unbelievably slowly,
opens.
He enters.
He goes to his bedroom.
Here they are:
his picture next to his little bed,
his schoolbag, in the dark,
awake.
He sees himself sleeping
between two dreams, two flags.
He knocks on the doors of all the rooms
– he almost knocks. But he does not.
They all wake up:
“He’s back!
By God, he’s back!” they shout,
but their clamour makes no sound.
They stretch their arms to hug Mohammed
but do not reach his shoulders.

He wants to ask them all
how they are doing
under the night shelling;
he cannot find his voice.
They too say things
but find no voice.
He draws nearer, they draw nearer,
he passes through them, they pass through him,
they remain shadows
and never meet.
They wanted to ask him if he’d had his supper,
if he was warm enough over there, in the earth,
if the doctors could take the bullet and the fear
out of his heart.
Was he still scared?
Had he solved the two arithmetic problems
in order not to disappoint his teacher
the following day?
Had he . . . ?
He, too, simply wanted to say:
I’ve come to see you
to make sure you’re alright.
He said:
Dad will, as usual, forget to take his hypertension pill.
I came to remind him as I usually do.
He said:
my pillow is here, not there.
They said.
He said.
Without a voice.
The doorbell never rang,
the visitor was not in his little bed,
they had not seen him.
The following morning neighbours whispered:
it was all a delusion.
His schoolbag was here
marked by the bullet holes,
and his stained notebooks.
Those who came to give their condolences
had never left his mother.
Moreover, how could a dead child
come back, like this, to his family,
walking, calmly, under the shelling
of such a very long night?

مريد البرغوثي‎, Murīd al-Barghūti (born July 8, 1944, in Deir Ghassana, near Ramallah, on the West Bank) is a Palestinian poet and writer. While Barghouti was studying at the University of Cairo in 1967, the 6-Day War broke out, and he was unable to return to the West Bank until 1996. He was expelled from Egypt in 1977 and was exiled in Budapest separated from his wife, the Egyptian novelist Radwa Ashour. They have been together in the West Bank since they were allowed to return together in 1996. Their son, Tamim Al Barghouti, born in Egypt in 1977, is himself an important Palestinian poet.

“. . . Don’t waste the tickets. . . ” Samīħ al-Qāsim – سميح القاسم

photo(2)-003
From
ei

Tuesday, 17 February 2015
ASHRAWI CONDEMNS ATTACKS AGAINST INNOCENT CIVILIANS IN EUROPE
PLO Executive Committee member, Dr. Hanan Ashrawi, met with the newly appointed Head of Mission of the Netherlands Representative Office, Peter Mollema, at the PLO Headquarters in Ramallah and welcomed him to Palestine.
In the meeting, Dr. Ashrawi expressed her hope that the Dutch government would continue to play a positive role in the region and to adopt serious and concrete political initiatives to bring Israel to compliance with international law, to end the military occupation, and to establish the independent Palestinian state on 1967 borders with Jerusalem as its capital. She also called on the Dutch government to recognize Palestine without preconditions in the immediate future. (Full story.)

Hanan Ashrawi
Hanan Ashrawi

Monday, 16 February 2015
OCCUPATION THREATENS TO UPROOT 2000 TREES NORTH SALFIT
Israeli occupation authorities on Monday handed threats to uproot about 2000 trees and splings in Haaris village northwest Salfit, West Bank, claiming that the land was “state property.”
Researcher Khaled Ma’ali told PNN that occupation handed the threats to the LandLord Amin Daoud, telling him that the land was confiscated. The case has been transferred to the Beit El settlement court for judgement, pointing that the landlord had papers proving property of land. (Full story.)

From

palestine news networkSunday, 15 February 2015
20,000 PALESTINIAN HOMES ON ISRAELI DEMOLITION SHORTLIST
Jerusalem Center for Social and Economic Rights (JCSER) has revealed that more than 20,000 Palestine homes in Jerusalem have been shortlisted to be demolished by the Israeli occupation authorities.
Ziad Hamouri, the center’s head, stated that the reason why these homes will be demolished is that they were built without building licences issued by the Israeli municipality in the occupied city of Jerusalem. Although, applications for such licences from Palestinians are rarely approved. (Full story.)

“Travel Tickets,” Samih al-Qasim

On the day you kill me
You’ll find in my pocket
Travel tickets
To peace,
To the fields and the rain,
To people’s conscience.
Don’t waste the tickets.

Samīħ al-Qāsim  سميح القاسم‎; (born 1939) is a Palestinian Druze whose Arabic poetry is well known throughout the Arab World. His poetry is influenced by two primary periods of his life: Before and after the Six-Day War. Al-Qasim has published several volumes and collections of poetry.

“. . . Summer is hand-blown Hebron glass. . .” (S.V. Atalla)

A weekly publication of cultural news from Palestine.

Website Logo

This week’s edition is titled “Then and Now.”
It includes “Music in Palestine, Then and Now,” by Amira Gabarin.

Each week the e-magazine includes on the home page the announcement:

We DEMAND that the Israeli army return out computers confiscated from our office during the army’s raid on our premises on 22 Jun 2014.

The Palestine Youth Orchestra
The Palestine Youth Orchestra

__________________________

poetry-arab-womenThe Poetry of Arab Women: A Contemporary Anthology. Ed. Nathalie Handal. Northampton, MA: Interlink Pub Group (December 2000). Available through Amazon.

From the introduction at Poetry.org:

“This recent volume showcases the work of over 80 accomplished and emerging Arab women poets. With the exception of Oman and Sudan, every Arab country is represented here, as are Arab women in exile or living in non-Arab countries and women poets of Arab descent from Europe and North America.

Individual poets represented here include Etel Adnan, Vénus Khoury-Ghata, Naomi Shihab Nye, and Sabah al-Kharrat Zwein.

A helpful 30-page introduction, with a focus on geography and history, helps to contextualize the poetry. Biographical notes of the poets and translators–as well as a listing of poets by country–are also useful, and will ideally lead readers to more in-depth explorations of individual poets.”

One of the poets represented in the anthology is the Palestinian-American
S.V. Atalla. She was born in New York, completed high school in Amman, Jordan, and now lives in Southern California where she teaches at Mt. San Antonio College. In 1992 she obtained an MA in Comparative Literature from UCLA. She is best-known for her translations of Arabic short stories and poems.

Atalla’s poems in The Poetry of Arab Women are “Diaspora” and “Visitng the West Bank.” Her poem “Story” was published in The Painted Bride Quarterly 47 (1992).

“Story,” by S.V. Atalla

Splitting seeds
in her teeth she spits out
the years like spelling,
one letter after the other.

Bits of Jerusalem
are chips of blue tile.
Summer is hand-blown Hebron glass,
slender, stoppered.

When she says, Jaffa
the iris of each eye is a dark fruit;
her knuckles knot
high in her rustling hair.

______________________________________
Excerpted from “Death by Immolation vs. Death by Isolation,” by Shukri Abu Baker of the Holy Land Foundation

The savage immolation of Jordanian fighter pilot, Lt. Muath Kasasbeh by Isis, once again demonstrated how ugly events can turn amidst a paradoxical war. Isis claims to be a genuine “Islamic State” while it has . . .[committed] some of the most prohibited acts in Islam. . . I have always had a problem with those who use the cloak of Islam as an outfit for all bodies of ugliness, and I find it hard to fathom how any Muslim could capriciously violate the teachings of his own religion in the name of the religion itself. . . Isis’s actions don’t represent Islam any more than Israel’s actions represent Judaism; thus, holding Muslims responsible for the crimes of the ‘Islamic State” is as wrong as holding Jews responsible for the crimes of the “Jewish State” Israel claims to be.

It is strangely quizzical,  how the international community, including a number of Arab regimes, have come together to destroy Isis because of its barbarism when last year, for 51 days, the world including Arab states stood idle, and  some actually grinned, as Israel unleashed its demonic forces onto Gaza taking 2,150 lives, 520 of them children. . .

“. . . this tragedy with a terrible root is too big for us. . .” (Naomi Shihab Nye)

FROM INTERFAITH PEACE BUILDERS
Delegation to Palestine/Israel
MAY 16-29, 2015
Co-Sponsored with the University of Georgia’s Catholic Center
and the Central Presbyterian Church of Atlanta
Leaders: Ilise Benshushan Cohen & Julie Norman

The United States has been the most dominant international player in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This delegation will examine the historic and current role of U.S. government and civil society intervention in the region. The delegation will meet with Palestinian and Israeli civil society leaders, activists and experts who will discuss the role of U.S. military, humanitarian and diplomatic aid, as well as its legal implications.

Full information at  INTERFAITH PEACE BUILDERS.

_____________________________________________
From The Electronic Intifada

Israeli Demolition of Palestinian woman’s home “a double crime”
Budour Youssef Hassan
11 February 2015

A massive Israeli police force raided the Palestinian neighborhood of Bayarat Shannir in Lydd, a city in present-day Israel, on Tuesday morning.Armed to the teeth and accompanied by bulldozers, hundreds of police officers stormed the neighborhood and sealed all entrances. At 10am, the police demolished the home of Hana al-Naqib, a mother of four, saying that it was built without a permit. Hana and her children, aged 7, 8, 14 and 15, were violently expelled from their newly-built home, as were the neighbors who came to support them.”

(REPORT CONTINUES HERE)

ei

Thirteen Palestinians revive lawsuit against US “charities” funding violent Israeli settlers

Submitted by Charlotte Silver on Wed, 02/11/2015

A group of Palestinians has decided to continue a lawsuit against several US-based “charitable organizations” accused of supporting violent Israeli Settlers in the occupied West Bank.

(REPORT CONTINUES HERE)

INFORMATION ABOUT THE ELECTRONIC INTIFADA
REGISTER FOR REGULAR EMAIL UPDATES FROM THE ELECTRONIC INTIFADA

___________________________________________

“Blood,” by Naomi Shihab Nye (b. 1952)
“A true Arab knows how to catch a fly in his hands,”
my father would say. And he’d prove it,
cupping the buzzer instantly
while the host with the swatter stared.

In the spring our palms peeled like snakes.
True Arabs believed watermelon could heal fifty ways.
I changed these to fit the occasion.

Years before, a girl knocked,
wanted to see the Arab.
I said we didn’t have one.
After that, my father told me who he was,
“Shihab”—“shooting star”—
a good name, borrowed from the sky.
Once I said, “When we die, we give it back?”
He said that’s what a true Arab would say.

Today the headlines clot in my blood.
A little Palestinian dangles a toy truck on the front page.
Homeless fig, this tragedy with a terrible root
is too big for us. What flag can we wave?
I wave the flag of stone and seed,
table mat stitched in blue.

I call my father, we talk around the news.
It is too much for him,
neither of his two languages can reach it.
I drive into the country to find sheep, cows,
to plead with the air:
Who calls anyone civilized?
Where can the crying heart graze?
What does a true Arab do now?