“. . . We learned to speak from the margins of pages . . .” (Jehan Bseiso)

SELECTED   NEWS   OF   THE   DAY. . .
|  INTERNATIONAL  FEDERATION  OF  JOURNALISTS  DEMANDS  RESPONSE  AFTER  ISRAELI  ATTACK  ON  JOURNALISTS  PROTEST
In an open letter to the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) demanded an urgent response to the unprovoked attack by Israeli forces . . . against a peaceful march organized by IFJ, at the Qalandiya checkpoint north of Jerusalem in the central occupied West Bank.    ___Several Palestinian and international journalists suffered severe tear-gas inhalation as Israeli forces suppressed the peaceful march . . .    ___The march was organized in support of the rights of Palestinian journalists and demanded freedom of movement for Palestinian journalists.    More . . .
|   PALESTINIAN  ‘GEEKS’  CODE  THEIR  WAY  TO  A  BETTER  FUTURE  IN  GAZA
By Fedaa al-Qedra
When Yasmin Helles was an English literature student at a Gaza college, she would spend most of her time online looking for information that could help her in academic life.   She always wondered who designed these websites . . . .   Six months ago, the 24-year-old saw an advertisement by Gaza Sky Geeks (GSG), a rapidly growing business and tech incubator, calling for young graduates to enroll in the first coding school in the beleaguered Palestinian territory . . .     [. . . .] Gazans are finding opportunities beyond the besieged strip. There is a rise in entrepreneurial start-ups and tech accelerators. . .  GSG’S  CODING  SCHOOL  was established in 2017 with funding from the likes of Google and London-based coding boot camp Founders & Coders. It aims to empower students to be full-stack developers . . .    More . . .
|  ISRAELI  SOLDIERS  ABDUCT  FIVE  PALESTINIANS  IN  BETHLEHEM  AND  JERUSALEM
Israeli soldiers abducted, on Sunday at dawn, five young Palestinian men from several areas in Bethlehem and Jerusalem, in the occupied West Bank, the Palestinian Prisoners’ Society (PPS) has reported.    ___The PPS said the soldiers stormed and violently searched many homes, and interrogated several Palestinians, before abducting three.    More . . .
. . . . Related  IOF  Opens  Fire  at  Farmers  and  Shepherds  Near  Gaza  Border
. . . . Related  Weekly Report On Israeli Human Rights Violations in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (08 – 13 November 2018)

COMMENTARY    AND    OPINION. . . .
|  STOLEN  CHILDHOODS:  GAZA’S  INJURED  CHILDREN  STRUGGLE  TO  COMPLETE  EDUCATION
For 16-year-old Gaza teenager Abdallah Qassem, getting to school every day is a challenge. . . .  after losing both of his legs during the Great March Return protests, he is now confined to a wheelchair, making the journey much more complicated.    ___Qassem lives in Gaza’s Sheikh Redwan neighbourhood in an apartment situated on the second floor. . .   he has to be carried down the narrow stairwell by his two older brothers.    [. . . .] Around 10,000 Palestinians have been injured during protests, including more than 1,800 children. According to al-Minawi, 210 of these children are registered in Gaza’s public schools and 92 of them have stopped going to school completely or are missing many classes due to their injuries.   More . . .

NOTICES  FROM  ORGANIZATIONS. . . .
|   UNRWA  AND  QATAR  CELEBRATE  THE  RIGHT  TO  EDUCATION  FOR  PALESTINE  REFUGEES  STUDENTS 
The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) organized a Back to School ceremony to celebrate support from the State of Qatar. The US$ 50 million contribution to the Agency’s education programme in Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and the West Bank was a vital component in the decision to open UNRWA schools without delay this August. The ceremony, held at the UNRWA Baqa’a Basic Boys’ School, affirms the importance of the right to education for Palestine refugees in the presence of the Qatar Fund for Development (QFFD) Managing Director H.E. Mr. Khalifa Bin Jassim Al-Kuwari.   Donate . . .

POEM  FOR  THE  DAY. . . . 

“BRAINSTORMING  NAKBA,”  BY  JEHAN  BSEISO
At curious four I asked my mother why Superman did not speak
the same language I did
She told me that
Our cartoon hero is a little boy forever ten
His hands clasped behind his back, invisible handcuffs
She told me I had to learn another alphabet, another geography,
In the Big Yellow Atlas, for kids, full of pictures
We stenciled in your awkward shape into maps that didn’t even want you
We had to learn your name in their language
They told me I spoke funny.
So I rinsed my accent at school; madraseh instead of madrasa
I read about diaspora and exile and power structures
Without knowing what they meant
So you’re American? On paper
And Jordan? Is what I know
And Gaza? An old wives tale
We are bastard children of hyphens and supplements and sentences
that start with
Originally I’m from . . .
At home,
Baba counted in dead bodies, in ratios, and for breakfast we had
Nostalgia and symbols
We read Kanafani, Darwiche, and Said
When we found tongues
We learned to speak from the margins of pages,
From the periphery
Maybe this is Freud’s “Oceanic feeling”.
A veritable storehouse in the unconscious
To be from a place and not know the place
There are simple ways of being in the world, I’m told.
Still I choose Za3tar and Shatta and this awkward Fat7a.

From: I  REMEMBER  MY  NAME:  POETRY  BY  SAMAH  SABAWI,  RAMZY  BAROUD,  JEHAN  BSEISO.  Vacy Vlazna, editor. London: Novum Publishing, 2016. Available from publisher.

“. . . youth did not stint in giving his blood for us. He understood. . .” (Mahmoud Shukair)

Photo by Shadi Hatem, Ma'an News Agency.
Photo by Shadi Hatem, Ma’an News Agency.

From MA’AN NEWS AGENCY

Israeli commander kills Palestinian teenager near Ramallah

July 3, 2015
BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) — A senior Israeli commander shot dead a Palestinian teenager in the West Bank Friday after he threw stones at his patrol, medics and Israeli officials said.
____Muhammad Hani al-Kasbah,17, was killed by two bullets after allegedly throwing stones at an Israeli military vehicle close to the Qalandiya checkpoint, south of Ramallah, medics told Ma’an.
(More. . .)

From MA’AN NEWS AGENCY
PALESTINIANS COMMEMORATE MURDER OF TEENAGER ABU KHDEIR
July 2, 2015
JERUSALEM (AFP) — Hundreds of Palestinians demonstrated in East Jerusalem Thursday to commemorate the first anniversary of a teenager being burned to death last summer.
____Muhammad Abu Khdeir, 16, was abducted and killed on July 2, 2014, weeks after the kidnap and murder of three Israeli teenagers in the West Bank.
____Protesters in the streets of Abu Khdeir’s Shufat neighborhood waved Palestinian flags and held up posters and images of the boy in a beige baseball cap, an AFP correspondent said.
(More. . .)

From THE ELECTRONIC INTIFADA
WHEN WILL DAD COME BACK?
Refaat Alareer
The story of my brother, martyr Mohammed Alareer
July 2, 2015
The last time my little niece Raneem saw her dad was when the Israeli shells were falling on the heads and houses of more than 10,000 Palestinians in Shujaiya, east of Gaza City, last summer. My brother Mohammed took the time to help guide many families to shortcuts in a desperate attempt to escape the flying shrapnel and debris.
____He never came back. Not because he did not keep his word, but rather because the Israeli occupation has developed a policy of destroying people and their relationships.
(More. . .)

A destroyed home in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip, 2 July 2015. Ashraf Amra APA images.
A destroyed home in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip, 2 July 2015. Ashraf Amra APA images.

❹Analysis
From THE MIDDLE EAST MONITOR (MEM)
RAND CORPORATION PREDICTS A BLEAK FUTURE FOR ISRAEL

Nonviolent resistance would cost Palestinians $12 billion over ten years and the Israelis $80 billion. Violent uprising, the worst of all possible scenarios, would cost Israel $250 billion (slightly less than its 2014 GDP) and the Palestinians $46 billion (more than three times their 2014 GDP).

Nasim Ahmed
July 2, 2015
The unsustainability of Israel’s occupation is acknowledged almost universally, yet its permanence is the only reality known to most Jews and Palestinians. Its supposed temporary nature has not prevented Israel from becoming more entrenched in its occupation, thus making any future peace deal unviable.
____This unbridgeable divide is reflected in the way that new generations of Israelis make increasingly greater demands on Palestinians . . . . while Palestinians have reached a near consensus that . . . there is nothing left for them to give other than to admit total submission and humiliation.
(More. . .)

❺ Opinion
From +972 MAGAZINE
ONE YEAR SINCE GAZA: WHY THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A ‘PRECISION STRIKE’

You often hear of an airstrike on Gaza being labeled a ‘precision strike.’ But how precise can a half- or one-ton bomb be when dropped on an area the size of Detroit?

Natasha Roth
July 2, 2015
“In Gaza, we use bombs that are extremely precise, and strike only Hamas targets – not civilians…” – Lt. Omer, Israeli Air Force Pilot [. . . .]
____When you read about an airstrike on Gaza by the Israeli Air Force, you invariably hear it being described as a “precision strike.” [. . . .]
____But look a little closer next time you read about the IAF’s “precision strikes.” . . . a phrase culled straight from the euphemistic military patois that goes into much of the IDF Spokesperson’s press releases (note that this is far from a uniquely Israeli phenomenon—see “surgical strikes,” below).
(More. . .)

“THE YOUTH,” BY MAHMOUD SHUKAIR
That tender-skinned youth did not stint in giving his blood for us. He understood. He understood, by virtue of his good instincts, that we needed clean air and a country, so he did not stint.
____It was his right to live so that he could get to know the country’s cities, one by one. It was his right to live so that he could go to university and read, at the least, ten thousand books. It was his right to live so that he could have a beautiful wife who would share the worries and joys of the world with him. It was his right to live so that he could live, like everyone else. Yet he understood by virtue of his good instincts that we. . . . so he didn’t stint. There he is leaving us now, clutching to the last a stone that he was going to hurl at the enemy.
Translated especially for this collection. (One of the “vignettes” from the collection of short stories. These “vignettes” are more like prose poems than short stories.)

From Shukair, Mahmoud. Mordechai’s Moustache and his Wife’s Cats, and other Stories. Translated by Issa J. Boullata, Elizabeth Whitehouse, Elizabeth Winslow, and Christina Phillips. London: Banipal Books, 2007.
Mahmoud Shukair has been a prodigious creator of short stories since the mid-1960s. He was born in 1941 in Jerusalem and grew up there. He studied at Damascus University and has an MA in Philosophy and Sociology (1965).
____He has published numerous volumes, including nine short story collections, 13 books for children, a volume of folk tales, a biography of a city, and a travelogue. He has written six series for TV, three plays, and countless newspaper and magazine articles, including for online publications.
____He worked for many years as a teacher and journalist, was editor-in-chief of a weekly magazine, Al-Talia’a [The Vanguard] 1994-96, and editor-in-chief of Dafatir Thaqafiya [Cultural File] magazine 1996-2000, when he was also director of literature for the Palestinian Ministry of Culture.
(More. . .)

Mahmoud Shukair
Mahmoud Shukair